History

Red roses and white: A brief history of the Tudor Rose

One of the most distinctive and unmistakable flowers in England is the Tudor Rose. This specific type of rose is both red (around the outside) and white (in the centre), and has been in use as the country’s plant emblem since the Tudor Era. But there is more to the Tudor Rose than meet the eye. The flower is not just a sight for sore eyes – it is a representation of the merging of two…
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History

Lord Mountbatten: The man behind Prince Charles

Growing up in the Royal Family is an experience quite unlike the childhood many (if not all) of us had. Although Prince Charles was lucky enough to have both his parents in his life, they were both quite absent from his upbringing. This was both due to the fact mummy and…
History

The Fifteen Princesses of Orange: Anna of Egmont

Anna of Egmont was born around March 1533 as the daughter of Maximilian van Egmont and Françoise de Lannoy. She would turn out to be their only child and thus heiress to her father’s estates. Her father was an ally of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and he was often…
History

The Screaming Lady of the Haunted Gallery: Catherine Howard

Catherine Howard was born around 1520 as the daughter of Lord Edmund Howard and Joyce Culpeper, and through her father’s side of the family she was a first cousin of Henry VIII’s second wife Anne Boleyn. Though she was of aristocratic birth, her father was relatively impoverished, being the younger son of a Duke. Her mother died in 1528 and Catherine was sent to live in the household…
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FeaturesHistory

Monarchy Rules: A look at King Henry VIII

One of Britain’s most colourful King’s and is easily most well known- but not for his heart-warming personality. Henry VIII most extraordinary claim to fame would be six wives and their unfortunate fates. Henry accomplished a lot more in his time as King, like…
History

Tales of the Tower: Lady Jane Grey

She is more popularly known as the ‘Nine Days Queen’ though is also remembered for her untimely demise within the walls of the Tower of London. Lady Jane Grey short-lived reign began on 10th July 1553 following the death of King Edward VI, who had personally named Lady…
History

The common illness that killed a Queen

In the early autumn days of 1537, King Henry VIII was celebrating as his court welcomed a prince. His longed for son and heir, Edward, had been born on October 12th at Hampton Court Palace to widespread rejoicing.  Preparations were in full swing for an elaborate christening and bonfires were being lit around the little boy’s future kingdom.  But while the parties started, in a corner of…
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History

The 1940s: The Queen Mother's finest decade

Though the 1930s brought about tumultuous change for the country and for Queen Elizabeth, the 1940s would soon become a decade that nobody would ever forget. It would also be the decade that Elizabeth would be dubbed ‘the most dangerous woman in Europe’ and…
History

Stories of the Stuarts: The Pendle Witches

It is the most famous witch trial of the 17th century, the case of the Pendle Witches. Twelve women were accused of witchcraft, and while one died, eleven went to trial. One was tried and found guilty at York while ten of the ‘witches’ were tried at Lancaster. Only one woman was found not guilty. Six of the eleven ‘witches’ on trial came from two rival families in Pendle.
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