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Snow and Royalty

Snow has provided enjoyment for countless generations of children and adults alike; royalty, of course, is no exception to this time-honoured rule. English monarchs have wintered at Windsor since the twelfth century. Windsor Castle was the preferred royal residence in whichto spend Christmas for Queen Victoria during Prince Albert’s lifetime, Osborne House being chosen on occasion only…
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A little-known royal plaque in Portsmouth

A plaque can be found in the garrison walls at Portsmouth at the location of the old ‘Sally Port’. Its patriotic inscription proclaimsthat “from this place naval heroes innumerable were embarked to fight their country’s battles” but that also, “near this spot, Catharine of Braganza landed in state, May 14 1662 previous to her marriage with Charles II at the Domus Dei a week…
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A monument that mentions a royal kiss

The sixteenth century late-GothicSint-Andrieskerk on the Augustijnenstraat in Antwerp preserves a monument with a quite extraordinary royal connection, for which reason many English visitors in particular, seek it out.In 1513,Augustine friars established a…
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The King's sister: the grave of the other Mary Tudor

Located in the beautiful Gothic church of St Mary’s at Bury St Edmunds, is the tomb of a princess of England and a brief queen of France, the thirdwife of Louis XII. The wife, daughter and sister of kings, she does not rest in the same royal burial place as her brother, King Henry VIII, who is buried at St George’s Chapel, Windsor – as is her husband, the Duke of Suffolk. Had…
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A quick look at royal dogs

The British love of dogs is, of course, well established, the royal affection for them as faithful companions being no exception to the rule. Corgis officially entered the British Royal Family when George VI, then Duke of York, gave two corgis named Dookie and Jane to his…
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Mozart's visit to what became Buckingham Palace

As part of the ‘Great European Tour’ of the Mozart family, which began from Salzburg in June 1763 and extended across the Holy Roman Empire to France, the Netherlands and Switzerland until November 1766, there was a long visit to London from April 1764 until 1 August…
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Tombs of Kings of England not in England

Outside of the traditional burial sites of Westminster Abbey and St George’s Chapel, Windsor, some English (and British) monarchs are missing. The tomb of King John resides in the chancel at Worcester Cathedral, not far from the chantry that contains the grave of the son of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York, Henry VIII’s elder brother Arthur, Prince of Wales. That of King Edward II is also one…
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