FeaturesHistory

Princess Louise and the Fife Tiara

Amongst the splendid suite of jewels commissioned for Queen Victoria by Prince Albert, features in the permanent exhibition Victoria Revealed at Kensington Palace, when it re-opened in full on 30 March 2018, two magnificent tiaras which were formerly owned by Louise, Princess Royal and Duchess of Fife, one of which will go on long-term loan to Kensington Palace for the exhibition, from the estate…
Read more
FeaturesHistory

The Duke of Kent: Queen Victoria's missing father

We know of course, that Queen Victoria’s relationship with her mother, the Duchess of Kent, whilst difficult in the early years of her childhood and adolescence, gradually improved with her marriage to Prince Albert, becoming one of genuine closeness and affection. The death of the Duchess of Kent in 1861 – nine months as history would show, prior to the death of Prince Albert – provoked an…
Read more
FeaturesHistory

Two little known royal weddings at St George's Chapel, Windsor

In addition to the four weddings of Queen Victoria’s children which took place at St. George’s Chapel, two other marriages were performed at St. George’s within the Queen’s family during her lifetime, which are far less known – that of Princess Frederica of Hanover, Baroness von Pawel-Rammingen (1848-1926) in 1880 and Princess Marie Louise of Schleswig-Holstein (1872-1956) in 1891. The…
Read more
FeaturesHistory

The first royal wedding at Windsor

Windsor’s first royal wedding took place in the twelfth century. What do we know about this wedding and why exactly did it take place at Windsor Castle? It was the second marriage of the third Norman King, Henry I (r. 1100-35). His thirty-five-year reign was one without…
FeaturesHistory

Queen Victoria's wedding

“Oh! This was the happiest day of my life!” With these words, Queen Victoria described her wedding day in her diary – 10 February 1840, writing up the event for the day’s entry from Windsor Castle. It marked the beginning of her marriage to her cousin, Prince Albert…
FeaturesHistory

The Queen of Tears? Caroline Mathilde: The British-born Queen of Denmark

In the magnificent twelfth-century Gothic cathedral church of Roskilde on the island of Zealand, thirty-nine Kings and Queens of Denmark are buried. One Danish queen, however, is missing – and by no mere accident or fluke of history. Members of the Royal House of Denmark that she knew, such as her formidable stepmother-in-law, Queen Juliana Marie, are at Roskilde, as is, of course, her one-time…
Read more