History

The Fifteen Princesses of Orange: Anna of Saxony

The second Princess of Orange, and also William the Silent’s second wife, is probably the most scandalous of them all. She was born on 23 December 1544 in Dresden as the daughter of Maurice, Elector of Saxony and Agnes of Hesse. She would be their only surviving child and she grew up in the court of the Saxony Electors. She was just nine when her father died and continued her education at…
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History

The Fifteen Princesses of Orange: Anna of Egmont

Anna of Egmont was born around March 1533 as the daughter of Maximilian van Egmont and Françoise de Lannoy. She would turn out to be their only child and thus heiress to her father’s estates. Her father was an ally of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and he was often…
History

Royals and witchcraft: Eleanor Cobham

Eleanor Cobham is perhaps one of the lesser known royal wives of medieval times. As with most women of her time, not much is known of her youth. She was born around 1400, probably at Sterborough Castle in Kent, which didn’t survive the reign of Oliver Cromwell. Her parents were Reginald Cobham, 3rd Baron Sterborough, 3rd Lord Cobham and Eleanor Culpeper. When she was around 22 years old, she…
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Palaces & Buildings

Archaeologists at Tower of London find ‘ritual protection’ to ward off evil

The Tower of London is perhaps England’s best known and premier fortress and has been for almost a thousand years, but now evidence has been found that its inhabitants sometimes felt far from safe. Recent research has been carried out by archaeologists from the Museum of London Archaeology in the residence of the Queen’s representative in The Queen’s House. Archaeologists have…
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Denmark

Prince Henrik of Denmark: why am I not king?

Prince Henrik of Denmark, husband and Prince Consort of Queen Margrethe II of Denmark has complained about the fact that he is not King of Denmark, but rather Prince Consort and has claimed that this constitutes sexism, according to an interview with French newspaper Le…
History

Sceptre gifted by Henry V to City of London after Battle of Agincourt goes on display

It’s just 17 inches tall, but it has a world of history embedded in its jewels. The beautifully bejewelled sceptre given in thanks by King Henry V of England to the City of London for the funding of his forces against the French at the Battle of Agincourt, fought in 1415, will go on display. It will be the first time in its 600-year-old history that the sceptre will go on display. It was…
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