Features

A Somerset church and the lost Palace of Whitehall

A fourteenth-century Anglican church in the Somerset parish of Burnham-on-Sea and Highbridge is not perhaps the place where you might expect to find several remnants from the lost Palace of Whitehall, the main London residence of England’s monarchs until 1698. A second fire destroyed most of Whitehall, with the exception of Inigo Jones’s magnificent neo-classical Palladian-style Banqueting…
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A monument that mentions a royal kiss

The sixteenth century late-GothicSint-Andrieskerk on the Augustijnenstraat in Antwerp preserves a monument with a quite extraordinary royal connection, for which reason many English visitors in particular, seek it out.In 1513,Augustine friars established a…
Features

A quick look at royal dogs

The British love of dogs is, of course, well established, the royal affection for them as faithful companions being no exception to the rule. Corgis officially entered the British Royal Family when George VI, then Duke of York, gave two corgis named Dookie and Jane to his daughters, Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret in 1933; Dookie being a name that the dog was given after the Duke of York. The…
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Mozart's visit to what became Buckingham Palace

As part of the ‘Great European Tour’ of the Mozart family, which began from Salzburg in June 1763 and extended across the Holy Roman Empire to France, the Netherlands and Switzerland until November 1766, there was a long visit to London from April 1764 until 1 August…
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Tombs of Kings of England not in England

Outside of the traditional burial sites of Westminster Abbey and St George’s Chapel, Windsor, some English (and British) monarchs are missing. The tomb of King John resides in the chancel at Worcester Cathedral, not far from the chantry that contains the grave of the son…
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The grave of Anne Boleyn

The new memorial that has been erected in front of the Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula on Tower Green marks the spot ‘identified’ in the Victorian period as being the site of the scaffold, which may have been a misunderstanding of the Tower’s geography in proportion to the apartments where Anne Boleyn had been housed. The fact that Anne’s burial place of St Peter ad Vincula lay only behind…
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Inside the room where Marie Antoinette was born

The Archduchess Maria Antonia of Austria – Mariabeing an establishedHabsburg prefix given to all the daughters of Empress Maria Theresia to mark the dynasty’s special veneration for The Virgin Mary – was born as the 15thchild of Maria Theresia on 2 November 1755 at around 8.30 in the evening, a ‘small, but completely healthy Archduchess’, as the Court Chamberlain…
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