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The Countess of Wessex supports The Duchess of Cambridge’s photo project

Sophie, Countess of Wessex
Picture by i-Images

The Countess of Wessex submitted a photograph to her niece-in-law, The Duchess of Cambridge’s COVID-19 photography project, Hold Still, on Thursday.

In the snap, Sophie captured a fellow volunteer, Ali, who was helping package meals at the Shah Jahan Mosque in Woking, Surrey, last month ahead of Eid.

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📦Packed with love . As part of #VolunteersWeek, The Countess of Wessex has contributed to The Duchess of Cambridge’s #HoldStill2020 photography project. @kensingtonroyal . “Ali helped to establish the Mosque’s food parcel delivery service for NHS workers, people self-isolating and other families in need, which has so far helped 400 households. . “Ali’s smile captures the enthusiasm for helping others that is so evident amongst the volunteers at the Mosque.” . ▶️🤳 The Countess took this picture on her phone whilst volunteering with Ali and others at the @shahjahanmosque in Woking. . Launched in collaboration with the @NationalPortraitGallery to capture a snapshot of the people of the UK at this time, Hold Still aims to reflect the spirit of the nation during the Coronavirus outbreak. . The Duchess of Cambridge and the National Portrait Gallery are inviting you to submit your own photographic portrait through @kensingtonroyal’s link in bio. #HoldStill2020

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Sophie captioned the photo ‘Packaged With Love’ and wrote, “Ali helped to establish the Mosque’s food parcel delivery service for NHS workers, people self-isolating and other families in need, which has so far helped 400 households.

“Ali’s smile captures the enthusiasm for helping others that is so evident amongst the volunteers.”

Kate partnered with the National Portrait Gallery in early May to capture “a snapshot of the people of the UK at this time,” that “will reflect resilience and bravery, humour and sadness, creativity and kindness, human tragedy and hope as we hold still for the good of others, and celebrate those who have continued so we can stay safe,” according to the Gallery’s website.

“Whilst many people’s lives are on hold to help protect our helpers and heroes, there are some that are working harder than ever, and others that are enduring the upheaval of hardship and loss.”

Kate said when announcing the project that, “We’ve all been struck by some of the incredible images we’ve seen which have given us an insight into the experiences and stories of people across the country. Some desperately sad images showing the human tragedy of this pandemic and other uplifting pictures showing people coming together to support those more vulnerable.”

One hundred photographs will be chosen to appear in a digital portrait gallery, with the hopes that Hold Still can transition to a physical gallery after the lockdown is over.

Kensington Palace noted that in the first week alone, over 7,500 photographs were submitted. And royal watchers spotted that the Duchess had been leaving comments on some Instagram posts using the hashtag #HoldStill2020.

On a photo of a child blowing a dandelion, she commented, “A perfect example of Hold Still… the chance to re-engage and value the simple things around us. C.”

Hold Still is accepting entries until 18 June.



About author

Jess is a communications professional and freelance writer who lives in Halifax and has a passion for all things royal, particularly the British Royal Family.