History

Cleopatra’s grave reportedly finally located



Historians in Egypt believe that the tomb of Cleopatra and Mark Antony will be “uncovered soon” as archaeologists believe they have finally discovered the long-long tomb close to Alexandria, Egypt.

Cleopatra and her husband, Mark Antony are believed to have been buried together in 30 BC. Archaeologists believe the tomb has been located around 18 miles from the famous historical Egyptian city.

The Egyptian archaeologist Zahi Hawass told the Mirror, “The long-lost tomb of Antony and Cleopatra will be eventually uncovered.

“The burial site has been finally estimated to be in the region of Taposiris Magna, 30km (18 miles) away from Alexandria.

“I hope to find the tomb of Antony and Cleopatra soon. I do believe that they are buried in the same tomb.”

Hawass continued, “We are so close to discover the accurate location of the tomb; we are on the right way.

“We know where exactly we have to dig.”

This announcement came just a few days after it was revealed that an ancient royal hall from the days of Ramses II had been discovered close to the same area as Cleopatra and Mark Antony’s supposed crypt. The ancient royal hall was “unearthed below soft-brick buildings and commercial residential areas,” according to the Mirror.

Cleopatra was the last active ruler of Egypt’s Ptolemaic Kingdom. Her husband, Mark Antony was a Roman politician, general and ally of Julius Caesar.

They died in 30 BC after being defeated by Octavian (later known as Augustus, who was the first Emperor of the Roman Empire). Popular belief is that Cleopatra committed suicide by allowing an asp (Egyptian cobra) to bite her, when she was 39. Greek and Roman historians have disagreed saying she died, via suicide, by poison through an ointment or sharp object. Mark Antony died by stabbing himself with a sword after wrongly believing Cleopatra was dead.



About author

Brittani is from Tennessee, USA. She is a political scientist and historian after graduating with a degree in the topics from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in December 2014. She also holds a master's degree from Northeastern University. She enjoys reading and researching all things regarding the royals of the world. Her love of royals began in middle school, and she's been researching, reading, and writing on royalty for over a decade. She became Europe Editor in October 2016, and then Deputy Editor in January 2019, and has been featured on several podcasts, radio shows, news broadcasts and websites.