Sweden

Prince Daniel visits the police’s youth group in Norrmalm


Photo: Erika Gerdemark, Royal Court, Sweden

Prince Daniel of Sweden visited, on Thursday last week, the youth group to the capital police at the station of Norrmalm. Prince Daniel accompanied the Stockholm Police Youth Group during one of their evening and night sessions. He also attended when they patrolled parts of Norrmalm and in other parts of central Stockholm. Prince Daniel brought several organisations working for the city’s young people with him.

Prince Daniel said during the visit: “I am grateful for the opportunity to meet some of all the good forces that work to make the city a safe and secure place for our young people. Policemen, security guards, health care personnel and others do a great and important job in environments that are often messy and demanding. Their efforts mean a great deal to prevent serious social problems such as crime and exclusion. “

Later that night, the Prince followed the police work in areas where the crime is high to get information and knowledge about the police efforts being made. Stockholm and Sweden have generally struggled with a great deal of crime the recent years, especially among youth and immigrant groups. This is a big problem. While in 1990 there were three areas in Sweden that were described by the authorities as dangerous to live in, this increased to 186 areas in 2012. Many of these areas are in Stockholm.

Prince Daniel during his visit to the Police. Photo: The Royal Court / Kungl. Hovstaterna.

The Prince’s visit to the Stockholm police comes just a few weeks after that a recent report from the Swedish police shows that the problems of crime in the capital are getting worse. The report confirms, among other things, that a total of 50 criminal gangs are raging in Stockholm alone.

Swedish media believe the visit was surprising in two ways. First, it was very nice done by the Prince, many point out, that he highlights an important problem with Swedish society, crime among young immigrants. On the other hand, many believe that it was dangerous for the Prince to put himself in risk by walking in these areas, even though he had a lot of police with him.

The Royal Swedish Court tells the Swedish press that both they and the Prince were familiar with the risk. Therefore, the visit was made last week but only made public on Monday of this week.



About author

Senior Europe Correspondent Oskar Aanmoen has a master in military and political history of the Nordic countries. He has written five books on historical subjects and more than 700 articles for Royal Central. He has also interview both Serbian and Norwegian royals. Aanmoen is based in Oslo, Norway.