The Cambridges

“Stop pestering Prince William at work” begs East Anglian Air Ambulance Chief Executive



Despite Prince William’s attempt at a more normal life as an Air Ambulance pilot, it is becoming increasingly more difficult as royal fans try to reach out to the pilot while he is at work.

Flight Lieutenant William Wales is pictured at the controls of a Seaking helicopter following his qualification as a Royal Air Force Search and Rescue pilot.

Flight Lieutenant William Wales is pictured at the controls of a Seaking helicopter following his qualification as a Royal Air Force Search and Rescue pilot.

Prince William’s fans have been requesting an untold number of messages to be passed on to the Duke of Cambridge. The chief executive of the East Anglian Air Ambulance has told fundraiser staff that they are not to pass messages on to him.

Since joining the charity in July, the second in line has assisted his team in responding to emergencies across East Anglia such as heart attack victims and a overdosed prisoner.

“A number of our supporters have already been in touch with us asking if we can pass on messages to The Duke of Cambridge.” said chief executive of the air ambulance, Patrick Peal.

“Unfortunately we are unable to do this through any of our charity staff or offices and respectfully ask that such requests are not put on our staff, please.”

Peal also urged the importance of allowing Prince William and the rest of the crew continue with their work and to leave them be when they are responding to emergencies.

“Like all our highly-skilled pilots who work with us through our helicopter provider, Bond Air Services, The Duke of Cambridge is with us to perform a vital role that enables our lifesaving service to operate.

“We understand that there will be more public interest about our service as a result but we hope that the people of East Anglia will always allow him and our other crew members respect and space to do their job at an emergency.”

Prince William, who flies an EC143 T2 aircraft and works day and night shifts that last nine and a half hours, donates his salary to charity.

New offices for the Duke and his colleagues are underway and to be completed this December.

Outfitted with a large kitchen and sleeping quarters to catch up on the all-important rest between the lifesaving missions such as a man suffering a heart attack to Papworth Hospital in Cambridge just last week.

He also recently made a trip to Highpoint South prison in Suffolk, where inmate Myra Hundley was believed to have overdosed while serving the last three weeks of her life sentence.

Prince William was protected by his bodyguard and four prison staff while paramedics treated her.

Photo Credit: Defence Images via Flickr