European RoyalsFeaturesInsightThe Netherlands

A look at the Dutch line of succession


© RVD Wesley de Wit

This summer, Royal Central is taking a look at the lines of succession of royal families around the world. Today we are looking at the Dutch line of succession.

The Dutch order of succession has just eight people, as only those who are relatives of the monarch in the first, second and third degrees of consanguinity are eligible to succeed to the throne.

The current monarch is King Willem-Alexander (b. 1967) who came to the throne in 2013 after the abdication of his mother, Queen Beatrix (now known as Princess Beatrix).

Photo: Moniek Bloks/Royal Central

Willem-Alexander became the heir apparent when his grandmother abdicated the throne in 1980, and his mother was invested as Queen Beatrix.

In 2002, he married Máxima Zorreguieta Cerruti, and they have three children: Princess Catharina-Amalia (the Princess of Orange), Princess Alexia, and Princess Ariane.

The line of succession is as follows:

1. Princess Catherina-Amalia, The Princess Orange, Princess of The Netherlands, Princess of Orange-Nassau (b. 2003)

Catharina-Amalia (commonly called Amalia). Aka Princess of Orange

The Princess of Orange is the eldest child of King Willem-Alexander and Queen Máxima. The Princess was born in The Hague on 7 December 2003. She was baptised on 12 June 2004 in the Grote of St Jacobskerk in The Hague. Prince Constantijn and Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden are among her godparents.

When her father was invested as King on 30 April 2013, Princess Catharina-Amalia was borne the title Princess of Orange, which can only be held by the heir to the throne.

The Princess of Orange lives with her parents and two sisters at Huis ten Bosch Palace in The Hague. She attends the Christelijk Gymnasium Sorghvliet in The Hague and enjoys hockey, singing, playing the piano, and horse riding.

2. Princess Alexia of The Netherlands, Princess of Orange-Nassau (b. 2005)

Photo: Moniek Bloks/Royal Central

Princess Alexia is the second daughter of King Willem-Alexander and Queen Máxima, born in The Hague on 26 June 2005. Princess Alexia was baptised on 19 November 2005 in the Dorpskerk in Wassenaar, and her godparents include the late Prince Friso and Queen Mathilde of Belgium.

She attends the Christelijk Gymnasium Sorghvliet in The Hague. Like her older sister, Princess Alexia enjoys hockey, horse riding, singing, and playing the piano.

3. HRH Princess Ariane of The Netherlands, Princess of Orange-Nassau (b. 2007)

Photo: Moniek Bloks/Royal Central

Princess Ariane is the third daughter of King Willem-Alexander and Queen Máxima. She was born in The Hague on 10 April 2007.  She was baptised on 20 October 2007 in the Kloosterkerk in The Hague. Her godparents include Hereditary Grand Duke Guillaume of Luxembourg.

She attended the Bloemcamp primary school in Wassenaar, and her hobbies include drawing, horse riding, hockey, and playing the piano. After the summer break, she will join her sisters to attend school at Christelijk Gymnasium Sorghvliet.

4. Prince Constantijn of The Netherlands, Prince of Orange-Nassau (b. 1969)

© RVD – Jeroen van der Meyde

Prince Constantijn is the youngest brother of King Willem-Alexander. He was born to Princess Beatrix and Prince Claus on 11 October 1969 at Utrecht University Hospital. Prince Constantijn studied law at Leiden University and today works for the RAND Corporation Europe in Brussels, as well as the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs in The Hague.

In 2001, he married Petra Laurentien Brinkhorst, and they have three children: Eloise, Claus-Casimir, and Leonore. The prince goes by the nickname Tijn and loves sport, including skiing, football, tennis, and golf.

5. Eloise, Countess of Orange-Nassau (b. 2002)

© RVD – HRH Prince Constantijn

Countess Eloise is the elder daughter of Prince Constantijn and Princess Laurentien. She was born in HMC Bronovo in The Hague on 8 June 2002. Her christening took place in the chapel of Het Loo Palace on 15 December 2002, and her royal godparents include the late Prince Friso, her father’s first cousin Princess Carolina, Marchioness of Sala, and the Crown Prince of Norway.

She moved with her parents, brother, and sister to The Hague in 2015, having previously lived in Brussels.

6. Claus-Casimir, Count of Orange-Nassau (b. 2004)

© RVD – HRH Prince Constantijn

Count Claus-Casimir is the middle child and only son of Prince Constantijn and Princess Laurentien. He was born on 21 March 2004, just one day after his great-grandmother (the former Queen Juliana) died.

He was baptised in the chapel of Het Loo Palace on 10 October 2004, and his godparents include King Willem-Alexander and Prince Maurits of Orange-Nassau, van Vollenhoven, who is the eldest son of Princess Margriet. The Count is known as ‘Clausimir’ by his family.

7. Leonore, Countess of Orange-Nassau (b. 2006)

Countess Leonore in 2012. © RVD – HRH Prince Constantijn

Countess Leonore is the youngest child of Prince Constantijn and Princess Laurentien. She was born on 3 June 2006 in The Hague. Countess Leonore was baptised in the chapel of Het Loo Palace on 8 October 2006, and Queen Máxima is one of her godparents.

8. Princess Margriet of The Netherlands, Princess of Orange-Nassau, Princess of Lippe-Biesterfeld (b. 1943)

© RVD – Anko Stoffels

Princess Margriet was born at the Civic Hospital in Ottawa, Canada, on 19 January 1943, the third daughter of Princess Juliana and Prince Bernhard. She is the sister of Princess Beatrix, the former Queen Beatrix.

The Princess lived in Canada until 2 August 1945, when the Netherlands was liberated, and the family moved back and set up residence in Soestdijk Palace in Baarn. She was educated at the University of Montpellier and Leiden University.

Princess Margriet married Pieter van Vollenhoven in 1967, and they have four sons: Prince Maurits, Prince Bernhard, Prince Pieter-Christiaan and Prince Floris.

You can read the rest of our summer series on lines of succession here.



About author

Kristin is Chief Reporter for Royal Central and has been following the British royal family for more than 30 years. She blogs about royal fashion and travel at royallybroke.com. Kristin has appeared in UK and U.S. media outlets discussing the British royals including BBC Breakfast, the Associated Press, TIME, The Washington Post, and many others.