European RoyalsSweden

A new royal baby for Sweden



Just days after celebrating a royal christening, Sweden has more royal baby news to enjoy. Prince Carl Philip and his new wife, Princess Sofia, have just announced they are expecting their first child. The baby is due in April 2016 and will be part of a mini royal baby boom in Sweden.

On Sunday, Carl Philip stood as sponsor to his new nephew, three month old Prince Nicolas, as he was christened at the Drottningholm Palace Church in Stockholm. Sofia sat in the front row to see her husband pour water into the font ahead of Nicolas’ christening. Now, just four days later, they have confirmed that they will be welcoming a baby next spring.

Their child will be fifth in line to the throne at birth. At the moment Carl Philip is third in line behind his elder sister, Crown Princess Victoria, and her daughter, Princess Estelle. Victoria announced a second pregnancy in September and her child is expected to be born in March next year when they will automatically become third in the line of succession moving Carl Philip down to fourth.

The parents to be made a brief statement as they confirmed the pregnancy, saying “We are so happy and excited to announce that we are expecting our first child. We are very much looking forward to it.”

Prince Carl Philip married Sofia Hellqvist on June 13th 2015 almost a year to the day that they announced their engagement. Their wedding was attended by royals from around the world including the Earl and Countess of Wessex. After their honeymoon, Sofia joined her husband in a busy round of royal engagements and the Swedish Court say there are no plans to change the couple’s agenda in the immediate future as they prepare for the birth of their baby.

And the royal baby boom in Sweden means that King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia will see their brood of grandchildren grow to five – the two babies expected in 2016 will join Princess Estelle and the children of Princess Madeleine, Princess Leonore and Prince Nicolas, in the next generation of Swedish royals.