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Prince Charles gives royal seal of approval to HMS Prince of Wales

As part of his recent visit to Scotland, Prince Charles visited the Babcock Facility in Rosyth and oversaw the final sponson being lowered into position to create the superstructure for HMS Prince of Wales. In a historic moment the Duke of Rothesay, as he is referred to in Scotland, gave the order for the Goliath crane to manoeuvre the massive 570 tonne section into position. This section which includes part of the flight deck will enable the workers to finish welding and make the vessel structurally complete.

Although the main construction has taken place at the Rosyth facility, the superstructure of the ship has been made of 52 sections. These have all been constructed at six separate facilities across the United Kingdom and brought together in Rosyth. The first piece of steel was cut in the Govan shipyard on 26th May 2011, under the watchful eye of Dr Liam Fox.

The next phase of construction of the ship will be the outfitting, testing and commissioning of her propulsion and mission systems. This will be followed by harbour trials in Rosyth, and sea trials in 2019 before the carrier is delivered off contract in 2019 for her final equipping at Royal Navy facilities on the south coast of England.

This 270m long aircraft carrier is the second of the Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers to be constructed. The first HMS Queen Elizabeth is due to be commissioned in May of next year, and be operational in 2020, three years before HMS Prince of Wales. At one point, it was thought that the ship would be mothballed due to defence cuts. However, at the Nato summit in Cardiff, Prime Minister, David Cameron announced the ship would be brought into active service.

As part of his recent visit to Scotland, Prince Charles visited the Babcock Facility in Rosyth and oversaw the final sponson being lowered into position to create the superstructure for HMS Prince of Wales. In a historic moment the Duke of Rothesay, as he is referred to in Scotland, gave the order for the Goliath crane to manoeuvre the massive 570 tonne section into position. This section which includes part of the flight deck will enable the workers to finish welding and make the vessel structurally complete.

Although the main construction has taken place at the Rosyth facility, the superstructure of the ship has been made of 52 sections. These have all been constructed at six separate facilities across the United Kingdom and brought together in Rosyth. The first piece of steel was cut in the Govan shipyard on 26th May 2011, under the watchful eye of Dr Liam Fox.

The next phase of construction of the ship will be the outfitting, testing and commissioning of her propulsion and mission systems. This will be followed by harbour trials in Rosyth, and sea trials in 2019 before the carrier is delivered off contract in 2019 for her final equipping at Royal Navy facilities on the south coast of England.

This 270m long aircraft carrier is the second of the Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers to be constructed. The first HMS Queen Elizabeth is due to be commissioned in May of next year, and be operational in 2020, three years before HMS Prince of Wales. At one point, it was thought that the ship would be mothballed due to defence cuts. However, at the Nato summit in Cardiff, Prime Minister, David Cameron announced the ship would be brought into active service.

These aircraft carriers are not designed to launch planes with a steam catapult, like so many carriers we have seen in the past. Rather they will carry varying payload of F35B Lightning II Stealth fighters, Merlin helicopters and troop carrying helicopters. The fighters are capable on short take-off and landing, and therefore do not need the assistance of a catapult launch. The carriers can also accommodate a contingent of around 250 Royal Marines.

These aircraft carriers are not designed to launch planes with a steam catapult, like so many carriers we have seen in the past. Rather they will carry varying payload of F35B Lightning II Stealth fighters, Merlin helicopters and troop carrying helicopters. The fighters are capable on short take-off and landing, and therefore do not need the assistance of a catapult launch. The carriers can also accommodate a contingent of around 250 Royal Marines.

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