25 April 2014 - 00:02
Updated: The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh honour Journalists’ Charity 150th anniversary

  
  Editor-in-Chief

The Queen, Patron of the Newspaper Press Fund, and The Duke of Edinburgh attended a reception to mark the 150th anniversary of the Journalists’ Charity at Stationers’ Hall in London on Wednesday.

The Journalists’ Charity began in 1864 when a group of parliamentary reporters decided one evening at a London pub that a charity to assist their colleagues and families who needed the aid was needed. One of the founders was Charles Dickens.

The Newspaper Press Fund was the original name and is still registered for legal purposes.

Queen Victoria supported the charity and bestowed the Royal Charter in 1890. She also granted the establishing of a “Victoria Pension” for widows. The Duke of Albany, the youngest son of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, chaired the charity appeal in 1882. Her grandson Prince Arthur was chairman in 1913.

In 1921 King George V became patron of the Fund.

Her majesty’s father, The Duke of York, chaired the 1930 appeal. He commented at the annual dinner in 1931: “I know what difficulties the reporter has to meet. He is frequently working when the rest of mankind is playing or sleeping; he is out in all weathers trying to obtain stories which everyone seems to be conspiring to keep from him.” He became patron when he became King in 1936.

In 2005, the Charity changed its working name to Journalists’ Charity. It offers one off grants and recurring payments for those who need long term care.

They offer housing at Ribblesdale which is housing complex in Dorking with eight bungalows and 15 flats. They also have 5 flats in Harmsworth House in Dorking which are able to rent for those who need assistance but wish for a bit more independent living.

In 2007 Pickering House was opened by The Countess of Wessex. It provides nursing to 20 residents who are 65 and older and may be suffering from dementia.

Stationers' Hall is at Ave Maria Lane near Ludgate Hill. The building and hall date from circa 1670.

Stationers’ Hall is at Ave Maria Lane near Ludgate Hill. The building and hall date from circa 1670.

The anniversary celebration will be held at Stationers’ Hall which is part of The Stationers’ Company and is the City of London Livery Company for the Communications and Content industries.

Livery Companies were established by groups of medieval tradesmen who mutually joined to advance, look after and control their trades. Charitable giving is a vast part of the work of all livery companies.

There are 108 livery companies in London, each a representative of a distinct profession or trade. Although some of the companies are now non-operational they continue to participate in many charitable causes.

Featured photo credit: West Midlands Police via photopin cc



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Edited by Cindy Stockman


Cindy Stockman

, Editor-in-Chief

Cindy is Royal Central's Editor-in-Chief.
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