17 September 2013 - 18:21
New book explores the Queen’s love of corgis

  
  Deputy Editor

Her Majesty

Royal biographer Brian Hoey has authored many books that take an interesting behind the scenes look at the Royal family and household. His newest publication takes a more in-depth look into a topic he has covered previously: the relationship between the Queen and her much beloved corgis (and dorgis).

As many well know, Her Majesty’s love for corgis began in 1933 when King George VI bought Dookie from a local kennel. The lasting relationship of the future queen and her corgis soon blossomed. A second corgi, Jane was introduced to the Royal Family. Jane had a litter and two more corgis, Carol and Crackers became part of the family.

On her 18th birthday, Her Majesty was given her much beloved corgi Susan. Susan is the corgi who started the breeding of successive line of dogs Her Majesty has had over the years. It is not only corgis have been part of the Queen’s pack of dogs. Princess Margaret bred her beloved Pipkin with a dachshund to create dorgis. Presently, Her Majesty has Willow and Holly, the two corgis and Vulcan and Candy, two dorgis.

The corgis lead a rather posh and pampered life. Never fed canned meals, the corgis dine on freshly chef prepared faire. Her Majesty feeds the dogs herself. The dinner of course is no ordinary task as one may think. The corgis wait patiently before they are given the royal approval before beginning their meals. “Then she, and only she, gives the royal command for them to begin eating. It’s as precise as that,” author Brian Hoey discussed in International Business Times.

corgis

Her Majesty sometimes allows the dogs to sleep in her room. On the nights they are not with the Queen, the dogs are tucked in their raised wicker beds in their own room. Her Majesty is also known to make Christmas stockings for each of the dogs complete with cookies, crackers, snacks and various toys. The dogs are reported to have had a few naughty incidents in the past from soiling carpets to nipping at ankles, many of the staff have walked away wearing a plaster on their hands and legs from nips and bites.

Hoey revels one of the stories that circulated the media a few years ago. During a holiday at Balmoral in 2011, Her Majesty noticed the dog’s meals were frozen in the middle. The cooks were let known the meals were to be fresh and by apparently Her Majesty shared her displeasure. “They were told in no uncertain terms that it should never, happen again and that all food had to be fresh,” according to the Daily Mail. It seems someone in the kitchen deemed it was just a meal for the dogs and did not take the request seriously. Obviously, this was never to happen again.

There is one Royal member who does not fancy the dogs as much as Her Majesty does, that is the Duke of Edinburgh. Apparently the Duke feels some animosity towards the four legged creatures. “The Duke loathes corgis….because they yap too much,” according to Hoey in International Business News.
One may ascertain that the corgis and dorgis give Her Majesty a respite from the regimented schedule of her daily life. The unbridled love and loyalty a dog provides is comforting. No one can deny the Queen adores her dogs. They as her family are treated like Royalty. “We can be replaced tomorrow; the dogs cannot,” a servant was quoted in The Daily Mail.

Pet’s By Royal Appointment by Brian Hoey will be published this week,

photo credit: Defence Images via photopin cc

photo credit: luckyno3 via photopin cc



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Edited by Cindy Stockman


Cindy Stockman

, Deputy Editor

Cindy is Royal Central's Deputy Editor.
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