8 January 2013 - 15:54
Church Of England Expresses Concern Over Primogeniture Law Change


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The Church Of England has voiced its concerns over the rushing of the bill to change primogeniture laws for succession in the United Kingdom. Just a day ago, Prince Charles voiced the same concerns to Whitehall officials about how rushing these changes has caused many oversights which must be sorted.

The Prince Of Wales’s original points were how, due to the bill being rushed through in anticipation of Prince William and Catherine’s first child, there are many holes in the bill which haven’t been rectified, such as if the Duke and Duchess’s first child marries a Catholic (as the bill proposes heirs to the throne be allowed to do), and they have children, what will their first child’s religion be (Cannon law dictates it should be raised Catholic) which would mean it couldn’t become head of the Church Of England.

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By the same token, The UK’s Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg has spoken out against these concerns. The Deputy Prime Minister told MPs that ministers’ plans to change the succession rules will not jeopardise the independence of the Church of England.

“I can give him complete reassurance that these proposals will not in any way alter the status of the established Church or the status of the monarch as head as head of the church,” Mr Clegg said.

The prince’s concerns could deal a blow to plans to change the royal succession law, after David Cameron struck a deal with the 15 other countries where the Queen is head of state that the rules must be overhauled. This could mean further delays or even the scrapping of the bill in its current form if  it’s discovered their are too many holes in this bill.







Martin

, Blogger

Martin was the Editor of Royal Central from July 2012 to July 2014. He can now be found on thecourtier.co.uk

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