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The Nobel Peace Prize 2016 in Norway

Our Europe Correspondent, Oskar Aanmoen, was at the Norweigan Nobel Peace Prize ceremony and dinner yesterday and reports on the day’s events.

The Norwegian Royal Family entering the hall for the ceremony. Photo: Oskar Aanmoen

The Norwegian Royal Family had a busy day yesterday. The day was entirely marked by the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize, a day that the Norwegian Royal Family has had many important tasks related to the distribution of the world’s most important peace award.

Crown Prince Haakon and Crown Princess Mette-Marit started the day with a visit to the Norwegian Nobel Peace Centre. Here they participated in the organisation “Save the Children’s” own Nobel party. Their Royal Highnesses spoke with a number of children about what peace is and why it is so important that we, in the future, must work to preserve global peace and prevent war. This party celebrated its twentieth anniversary yesterday.

The Colombian Peace Prize winner arrived Oslo yesterday and attended the children’s party. The Norwegian children, who organised the party, had a wish that also Colombian children could attend. Therefore, the organisation “Save the Children” brought two war-torn Colombian children to Oslo so that they could celebrate the Colombian peace in Oslo.

Oslo City Hall. Photo: Oskar Aanmoen.

After the party was over, Colombia’s President was welcomed by King Harald and Queen Sonja at an audience at the Norwegian royal castle. The Crown Prince and Crown Princess were also present during the audience. King Harald and President Santos discussed the peace in Colombia and a number of other important issues behind closed doors. At one o’clock, it was time for the day’s most important event, the peace prize ceremony.

The Nobel Peace Prize was, as usual, handed to President Santos in Oslo City Hall. King Harald, Queen Sonja, Crown Prince Haakon and Crown Princess Mette-Marit were present and sat in the front row during the award ceremony. It is a royal rule that the Royal Family are the last to come into the town hall’s large banqueting hall. At all public events, the King’s arrival is to be notified by soldiers from His Majesty the King’s Guard playing the fanfare “The King is Coming”.

At the bottom of this article, you can see the entire ceremony.

Last night, the King, Queen, Crown Prince and Crown Princess attended a great gala dinner at the old Grand Hotel in Oslo with the award winner and a selection of guests. Today the Prizewinner will be honoured with a big concert, and the Crown Prince and Crown Princess will attend. On Monday, President Santos will meet the King of Sweden in Stockholm.

King Olav V and then Crown Prince Harald congratulates Nobel Peace Prize winner for 1963. It was the Red Cross that won this year. Photo: Red Cross via Wikimedia Commons.

The Norwegian Royal Family has played a central role in the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize since Norway became independent in 1905. Throughout history, the Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to a number of controversial people. There is only one single time that the Norwegian Royal Family has chosen to boycott the peace prize ceremony. This happened in 1935 when the Nobel Peace Prize was given to the German native, Carl von Ossietzky. King Haakon VII justified the boycott when Alfred Nobel’s family said they were opposed to the awarding of the prize to von Ossietzky.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-uNKf0Go9Y

  • Mr. Christian

    Dynamite Nobel has often disgraced the name of true “Peace” based upon seeking a mutual “Harmony of Interest.” I watched in silence as Prince Charles brought Santos to meet the Queen, wondering how much drug money Prince Charles got for it. PM Teresa May got $10 billion in Dope Dollars during her meeting with Santos. It is not just a question of Norwegian children “hopping” that Colombian children were at the ceremony. Santos, whose act of “peace” was to legalize the drug makers and dealers, could have spent the money from his Nobel Prize to bring some to the ceremony to speak out about life in a country rife with narco-terrorists. Perhaps next the Prize should be given to the King of Saudi Arabia for ISIS burning women in cages, instead of just frying their minds with narcotics. Bringing the corpses of Yemen children starved to death would be probably applauded by many who know what the “Peace Prize” has meant: “The peace of the grave.”

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