7 December 2013 - 08:28
Prince Charles deplores the madness of abandoning ‘perfectly sound’ Heritage houses


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The Prince of Wales

As reported by Royal Central last week, the Prince of Wales attended the English Heritage dinner to honour of 100 years of heritage protection. At the centenary celebration, the dinner commemorated the reopening of Kenwood House. Charles toured the revamped rooms that were furnished in 18th century style, the restored Robert Adam rooms and viewed the art collection of Kenwood House. He was also introduced to some of the staff and volunteers who were part of the restoration.

“It is frequently forgotten, I find, just how much so many people love the old buildings in their area, surrounded as they are by increasing ugliness and disintegration,” Charles mentioned in The Telegraph.

During his speech to Heritage members, he noted his long held belief that “the heritage sector needed to find better ways of dealing with the sale of properties.”

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“If a purchaser fails to do anything with the building within, say, two or three years, or fails to find a sensitive, sympathetic solution for it, then they should be required to return the property to the public body that originally owned it or, at least, have it transferred to a charitable body which has the experience, talent and means to do something with it,” expressed The Prince.

“There can be no doubt that the introduction of a set period of time in which to maintain or restore a building can be a key element in making the most of what is left of our heritage.” The Prince stressed his hopes that the parties who play a key role in heritage protection, devise plans to work in tandem to save these buildings.

Chief Executive of English Heritage, Simon Thurley commented “he looked forward to considering the Prince’s proposal and responding in due course.”

Known for his passionate support to save and restore heritage buildings, Charles also oversees his own Regeneration Trust. “Personally I am not prepared to sit back and see this legacy of historic buildings needlessly squandered; especially as with a little imagination, they can become real community assets to their local communities, offering job opportunities, and focus for local regeneration schemes,” Charles noted on The Prince’s Trust Regeneration website.

photo credit: UK in Spain via photopin cc



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Edited by Cindy Stockman





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