5 June 2014 - 14:28
Prince Charles and The Duchess of Cornwall’s honour Glider Pilot Regiment


Editor-in-Chief

Thursday was a very busy day as The Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall attended eight engagements to honour the 70th anniversary of D-Day.

On Thursday the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall met troops from the Glider Pilot Regiment at Pegasus Bridge. The Regiment began the first assault of the D-Day invasion.14353400022_0ac42bd142_b

If one has watched the film The Longest Day, then perhaps the team of gliders landing silently to take the Pegasus and Horsa Bridge over the Orne River may seem familiar.

Led by Major John Howard, the Glider Pilot Regiment secured the bridges after a 15-minute battle. Two soldiers were killed and 14 wounded. Lieutenant Den Brotheridge and Lance Corporal Fred Greenhalgh. Greenhalgh drowned in a nearby pond when his glider crash landed. Brotheridge was killed crossing the bridge in the first minutes of the offensive and consequently became the first member of the invading Allied armies to die as a result of enemy fire on D-Day.

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Prince Charles, Colonel-in-chief, Army Air Corps and The Duchess participated in a short prayer before Charles laid a wreath in front of the Glider Pilot Memorial. After the ceremony he Royal couple met Glider Pilot Regiment veterans and serving members of the Army Air Corps.

The memorial at Pegasus Bridge comprises three upright stone columns located where each of the three Horsa gliders landed. A bust of Major John Howard is positioned close to one of the columns.

 


Featured photo credit:  UK in France



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Edited by Chloe Howard





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